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Overview
  • How are reviewers describing this item?
    jewish, novel, through, russian and set.
  • Our engine has profiled the reviewer patterns and has determined that there is high deception involved.
  • This product had a total of 10 reviews as of our last analysis date on Apr 22 2020.
Details

BETA

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Most positive reviewquestion

The Slaughterman's Daughter is one of the only books I've ever read which truly merits comparison to War and Peace in its scope...  Read More

Least authentic reviewquestion

For a story that takes the reader through the corridors of power, people and history of 19th century Belarus, that title is int...  Read More


Helpful Insights

BETA

This feature is in BETA, meaning the algorithms used to provide these results are constantly improving. These results might change.

    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    Having no point of reference, i had to look up all the jewish slang that was tossed throughout here and there in the book.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    It gave me a chance to better grasp the atmosphere around the world building the author tried capture.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    Undoubtedely this is a novel full of adventure, subtle dark humour on tradition and superstition, a journey of self-discovery and release of society's ethical bondage.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    So far so reasonable, but what happens after fanny abandons her own family to set out on her quest stretches credulity as events spiral out of control.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    It’s not only a compelling story but offers a vivid portrait of jewish life in the pale, a lost jewish world in the russian empire when anti-semitism is not just rife but frequently disastrous.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    The slaughterman's daughter is a historical adventure, set in the late 19th century in the pale of settlement (an area of imperial russia including belarus and parts of poland) where jews were forced to live.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    In the isolated, godforsaken town of motal husbands go missing on a regular basis (they've usually run off in search of a better life) but never wives and mothers.

Review Count History
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