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Overview
  • How are reviewers describing this item?
    great, small, inside, good and size.
  • Our engine detects that in general the reviewers have a suspiciously positive sentiment.
  • Our engine has profiled the reviewer patterns and has determined that there is high deception involved.
  • Our engine has analyzed and discovered that 18.7% of the reviews are reliable.
  • This product had a total of 467 reviews as of our last analysis date on Jul 22 2019.
Details

BETA

Most positive reviewquestion

Perfect size for mixing a face mask or crushing herbs.

Least positive reviewquestion

Not enough review data to provide meaningful insight.

Most authentic reviewquestion

Not enough review data to provide meaningful insight.

Least authentic reviewquestion

use for grinding pigment for paint


Helpful Insights

BETA

    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    I had one like this back years ago but lost it in a move, so had to return to the drawing board to compare models.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    Spent way too long looking at options to come back to this same model which was just fine to begin with, if i hadn't lost the original.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    I was scared to ordered it, because porcelain stuff always comes broken, or cracked, but this one didn't.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    Sometimes powder sticks to the pestle, and is difficult to clean off.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    The inside of the bowl also chipped in one spot.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    It's definitely not a plastic pos.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    The package was packed securely and nothing was broken.


    Posted by a reviewer on Amazon

    I like the dark blue colored glaze and the octagon shape of the mortar (it is rounded inside the mortar), and it is well made and heavy, it reminds me of those blue glazed ceramic tiles on the roof of temples in china.

Review Count History
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Price History
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